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Degree Programs for English Education

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Bring Your Love of Literature and Writing to Others

Teach the next generation of storytellers.

You are interested in language and writing as exploration, as storytelling, and as self-expression. And you want to share your passion for these things with students in a classroom of your own one day.

At Saint Rose, you will work with award-winning scholars and writers in small classes, and have the opportunity to share your love of English with others while you analyze literature, film, and other texts. We have several pathways for students who are passionate about writing and literature and who also aspire to become teachers.

At Saint Rose, you will develop your ability to think and write critically against the grain of received ideas – all while also taking education coursework to learn how to inspire this passion in the classroom and teach students for the future. You will have the opportunity to student-teach to gain practical experience in applying what you learn in your English classes.

Get Your Guide

Download our quick guide for info on English minors and concentrations, and check out the latest stats and great career outcomes for English majors at Saint Rose.

Program Highlights

  • Did you know that approximately 1 in 10 Saint Rose undergraduates is either a major or concentrator in English? Become part of a vibrant and growing network of Saint Rose English alums.
  • Be part in a thriving culture of scholars and writers. Present research or read original work at our yearly English Symposium, join the English Club, the chapter of Sigma Tau Delta honor society, edit and write for the Chronicle newspaper. Get involved with a digital humanities project on an early 20th-century Black magazine or join the staff of our literary journal, Pine Hills Review.
  • Find your voice as a writer with the power to communicate, move, and persuade. You will share your passion for literature, writing, and performing with the next generation of K-12 students.
  • Be eligible for one of our annual awards for distinguished students, including the Senior Writing Award, the Outstanding Senior in English Award, and the Outstanding Senior in English Adolescence Education Award.
  • Tailor your course of study by selecting one or more of these minors:
    • Literature
    • Writing
    • Digital publishing
    • Film and Digital Media Studies
  • Our final year of teacher preparation at Saint Rose culminates in a semester of student teaching.
  • We have more than 28,000 teacher-education alumni. You’ll find a vast Saint Rose educator network when it comes time to launch your career.
  • Saint Rose has a longstanding reputation for producing top-notch teachers. We’re the first place superintendents in the Capital Region call when they’re looking for job candidates.

English Education Degree Options

The English Department has a long history of teaching the educators of the future and preparing our students to be inspirational teachers.

Our student-teachers leave our program with the skills needed to teach literature created across historical time periods and geographical spaces, to help students find their voices as writers, and to provide those students with the tools they need to critically analyze their world.

BA English Adolescence Education

Combine a sequence of education courses with coursework in literature, media/performance, writing, and more. These majors study to qualify for initial certification by New York State to teach English in grades 7-12.

As an English Adolescence Education major, you will develop valuable skills in reading closely, thinking analytically, and writing with clear insight. English Adolescence Education majors combine a sequence of education courses with their coursework in the history of English studies, media/performance, creative writing, and more. These majors study to qualify initial certification by New York State to teach English in grades 7-12.

Our 48-credit major offers you the opportunity to investigate a variety of literary periods and genres from various cultures, to explore creative and professional writing, and apply critical theories relevant to literary study, and to work with film and digital media.

The major is structured to help you progressively develop your skills, and culminates in English 498, our Senior Seminar, and a semester of student teaching. In Senior Seminar, you will work with a faculty member and other seniors in a small seminar setting, with each student producing a high-quality written and researched piece of scholarly literary research.

View Course Requirements

My work in the English Department at Saint Rose pushed me to see situations from multiple perspectives and made me a more compassionate human being.

After several years working as an English teacher in small urban school districts, I am now a house principal at Farnsworth Middle School in Guilderland, New York. I love the work I do every day, and I feel fortunate to be part of my school community.

Kelly Willetts '09 G'12

House principal at Farnsworth Middle School in Guilderland, New York BA English Adolescence Education ’09 MSED Curriculum and Instruction ’12

Adolescence Education and Special Education BA/ MSED Dual-Degree ASPIRE Program

Gain dual certification in New York State for teaching grades 7-12 in our five-year dual-degree BA/MSED Adolescence Special Education for Inclusive and Reflective Educators (ASPIRE) Program.

In New York State, teachers are required to earn a master’s degree in their first five years of teaching. ASPIRE students have a leg up!

Aspire Program

I took many classes with Dr. Frances Ihle for the ASPIRE program and had her as my advisor all five years. She is an incredible professor and her passion for her work is contagious. She was always there to support us and I know I will carry her classes with me throughout my career.

English Adolescence Education/Special Education Major

Maja De Garay ‘21, G’21

English Concentration for Childhood Education Majors

Concentrations in English prepare students who are majoring in childhood education and seek to teach K-8 levels.

At one point in my life, I was interested in teaching adolescence education for English. After completing a program in high school that sparked my desire to teach at the elementary level instead, the English concentration gave me the opportunity to still dive into an area of interest of mine! As I worked through the courses for the concentration, it ultimately led me to pursue a master's degree in literacy, which would give me the opportunity to teach reading as a reading specialist as well as an elementary classroom teacher. Now being in the field, I see how important reading is for children.

It is cross-curricular, it is how we gain background knowledge, but it is also an escape for students to be immersed in another world with characters they love. Having this concentration has absolutely made me a better teacher in all subject areas, as well as a promoter of the fun that reading can bring to children at a young age!"

Samantha Walsh '15 G'16

Third-grade teacher at Watervliet Elementary School in Watervliet, New York BS Childhood Education with a concentration in English '15 MSED Literacy Birth-6 G’16

Meet Our English Faculty

Our faculty are are active in their fields, but your success is their top priority. That’s why Saint Rose has been named a top 25 college for professors who excel at teaching undergraduates by U.S. News & World Report for the second year.
Douglas R. Butler Associate Professor of English

I am hardwired for literature. My father drove Robert Frost around in my family’s 1960 Rambler. I have stalked beat writers and delta blues guys. My primary interest is in Renaissance and Enlightenment drama—in particular, how plays reflect and drive the culture.  I have published pieces in both academic and trade journals.  My fly-fishing articles have found homes in Fly Rod & Reel, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and Hudson Valley Magazine.

May Caroline Chan Associate Professor of English

I received my doctorate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where I wrote my dissertation on Victorian British travel narratives about China. I have been working on a series of essays about Isabella Bird Bishop, one of the more well-known travelers of the period, particularly her relationships with religion, men, and illness. I regularly teach courses in Victorian literature, Asian American literature, and Jane Austen adaptations. My Asian American literature class is a way to honor the memory of my mentor, Dr. Amy Ling, for her work in Asian American literature and studies.

Eurie Dahn Associate Professor of English

My expertise is in African American literature and U.S. literature, especially in relation to magazines and newspapers of the 20th century. My courses, such as “Growing up Black in the U.S.” and “Surveillance, Privacy, and Power,” teach students to analyze literature to develop insights about structural inequality, power, and resistance. I am author of “Jim Crow Networks: African American Periodical Cultures” and essays on Black print.

View Full Bio

Kathryn Laity Associate Professor of English

My Ph.D. is interdisciplinary; my interests are, too. I’m currently researching a medieval Scots tale where a collier encounters an Arab knight in France. I’m not stuck in the past though; in 2011 I was a Fulbright Fellow in Digital Humanities at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Everything’s digital now, including publishing: as an author and editor of crime & speculative fiction, I’ve put my practical experience to work in our Digital Media courses.

View Full Bio

Douglas R. ButlerAssociate Professor of English

I am hardwired for literature. My father drove Robert Frost around in my family’s 1960 Rambler. I have stalked beat writers and delta blues guys. My primary interest is in Renaissance and Enlightenment drama—in particular, how plays reflect and drive the culture.  I have published pieces in both academic and trade journals.  My fly-fishing articles have found homes in Fly Rod & Reel, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and Hudson Valley Magazine.

May Caroline ChanAssociate Professor of English

I received my doctorate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where I wrote my dissertation on Victorian British travel narratives about China. I have been working on a series of essays about Isabella Bird Bishop, one of the more well-known travelers of the period, particularly her relationships with religion, men, and illness. I regularly teach courses in Victorian literature, Asian American literature, and Jane Austen adaptations. My Asian American literature class is a way to honor the memory of my mentor, Dr. Amy Ling, for her work in Asian American literature and studies.

Eurie DahnAssociate Professor of English

My expertise is in African American literature and U.S. literature, especially in relation to magazines and newspapers of the 20th century. My courses, such as “Growing up Black in the U.S.” and “Surveillance, Privacy, and Power,” teach students to analyze literature to develop insights about structural inequality, power, and resistance. I am author of “Jim Crow Networks: African American Periodical Cultures” and essays on Black print.

View Full Bio

Kathryn LaityAssociate Professor of English

My Ph.D. is interdisciplinary; my interests are, too. I’m currently researching a medieval Scots tale where a collier encounters an Arab knight in France. I’m not stuck in the past though; in 2011 I was a Fulbright Fellow in Digital Humanities at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Everything’s digital now, including publishing: as an author and editor of crime & speculative fiction, I’ve put my practical experience to work in our Digital Media courses.

View Full Bio

Jennifer Marlow Associate Professor of English

My specialization is in writing studies, and I coordinate the College’s First-Year Writing Program. My academic work has been published in Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and Forum. I co-produced the documentary film, Con Job: Stories of Adjunct and Contingent Labor, which won the 2014 Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award. My co-authored eBook, “Are We There Yet? Computers and the Teaching of Writing in American Higher Education — 20 Years Later”, is available from Computers and Composition Digital Press. I have recently returned to my first writing love, creative nonfiction, and am working on a collection of micro-memoirs about motherhood.

View Full Bio

David Morrow Associate Professor of English

I teach classes in early modern English literature and culture, including Shakespeare, as well as environment-themed courses focused on the present day, including “Ecology and Film.”My research combines these two interests. I study the processes through which human relationships to the natural world were changing in 16th- and 17th-century England, and how literary and other texts interpreted these changes. I have an essay on Shakespeare’s play
“Pericles”
 and agrarian capitalism forthcoming in the second edition of Blackwell’s “A Companion to the Global Renaissance.”

View Full Bio

Daniel Nester Professor of English

I teach writing in all shapes and forms, and enjoy helping fellow writers develop their voices. In Poetry in Performance, students perform work onstage. In another, students help edit Pine Hills Review. As a writer, I’ve published essays, poems, journalism, and memoir. I’ve written books about my obsession with the rock band Queen, a coming-of-age memoir, pop culture-soaked poems, and humorous essays. I edited the first-ever anthology of sestinas. Lately, I’ve enjoyed developing online courses that take advantage of the newest tools and technologies.

View Full Bio

David Rice Associate Professor of English

I study and teach 20th-century American literature, Native American literature, and composition. I’m interested in intersections between literary texts and culture, such as music and literature, indigenous oral stories and Native American novels, and digital humanities. I teach online as well as in person, and I’m continually looking for ways to enhance students’ literary study with digital technology.

View Full Bio

Jennifer Marlow Associate Professor of English

My specialization is in writing studies, and I coordinate the College’s First-Year Writing Program. My academic work has been published in Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and Forum. I co-produced the documentary film, Con Job: Stories of Adjunct and Contingent Labor, which won the 2014 Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award. My co-authored eBook, “Are We There Yet? Computers and the Teaching of Writing in American Higher Education — 20 Years Later”, is available from Computers and Composition Digital Press. I have recently returned to my first writing love, creative nonfiction, and am working on a collection of micro-memoirs about motherhood.

View Full Bio

David MorrowAssociate Professor of English

I teach classes in early modern English literature and culture, including Shakespeare, as well as environment-themed courses focused on the present day, including “Ecology and Film.”My research combines these two interests. I study the processes through which human relationships to the natural world were changing in 16th- and 17th-century England, and how literary and other texts interpreted these changes. I have an essay on Shakespeare’s play
“Pericles”
 and agrarian capitalism forthcoming in the second edition of Blackwell’s “A Companion to the Global Renaissance.”

View Full Bio

Daniel NesterProfessor of English

I teach writing in all shapes and forms, and enjoy helping fellow writers develop their voices. In Poetry in Performance, students perform work onstage. In another, students help edit Pine Hills Review. As a writer, I’ve published essays, poems, journalism, and memoir. I’ve written books about my obsession with the rock band Queen, a coming-of-age memoir, pop culture-soaked poems, and humorous essays. I edited the first-ever anthology of sestinas. Lately, I’ve enjoyed developing online courses that take advantage of the newest tools and technologies.

View Full Bio

David RiceAssociate Professor of English

I study and teach 20th-century American literature, Native American literature, and composition. I’m interested in intersections between literary texts and culture, such as music and literature, indigenous oral stories and Native American novels, and digital humanities. I teach online as well as in person, and I’m continually looking for ways to enhance students’ literary study with digital technology.

View Full Bio

Ronald Shavers Associate Professor of English

I’m a writer and scholar who tends to straddle the critical/creative divide, so I teach both creative writing (mostly fiction) and contemporary multi-ethnic literature. It all means that my criticism and essay-length reviews have appeared in such diverse publications as American Book Review, BOMB, and Fiction Writers Review, while my fiction has appeared in innovative literary journals like Another Chicago Magazine, Big Other, Black Warrior Review, and The College of Saint Rose’s very own Pine Hills Review. Oh, and did I mention that my latest work, an experimental Afrofuturist novel titled “Silverfish”, was recently released by Clash Books? Overall, I like helping students reach their full potential.

Brian Sweeney Associate Professor of English

I teach and research US and African American literature and print culture of the 19th and early-20th centuries. Courses I teach include “Crime and Punishment in Poe’s America”; “US Literature, Magazines, and Mass Print”; “Sympathy and the Early US Novel”; and our literary theory course. I’m co-editor of a forthcoming edition of Pauline Hopkins’s 1903 Afrofuturist novel “Of One Blood”; I co-direct a digital humanities project on the Colored American Magazine, an early-20th century Black periodical; and I’m completing a book on professionalism, affect, and the novel. As a first-gen college graduate, I’m committed to mentoring undergraduate research and working to expand student access to and engagement with digital archives.

View Full Bio

Barbara Ungar Professor of English

My specialization is in poetry, particularly 19th- through 21st-century poetry. A passionate and devoted teacher, I love to teach literature, from early world literature right up to contemporary American, as well as creative writing. I have published eight books of poetry, several of which have won multiple awards. My most recent is a chapbook, “EDGE” (named for the Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered species lists), inspired by my current research and teaching interest: the sixth extinction and global climate crisis.

View Full Bio

Ronald ShaversAssociate Professor of English

I’m a writer and scholar who tends to straddle the critical/creative divide, so I teach both creative writing (mostly fiction) and contemporary multi-ethnic literature. It all means that my criticism and essay-length reviews have appeared in such diverse publications as American Book Review, BOMB, and Fiction Writers Review, while my fiction has appeared in innovative literary journals like Another Chicago Magazine, Big Other, Black Warrior Review, and The College of Saint Rose’s very own Pine Hills Review. Oh, and did I mention that my latest work, an experimental Afrofuturist novel titled “Silverfish”, was recently released by Clash Books? Overall, I like helping students reach their full potential.

Brian SweeneyAssociate Professor of English

I teach and research US and African American literature and print culture of the 19th and early-20th centuries. Courses I teach include “Crime and Punishment in Poe’s America”; “US Literature, Magazines, and Mass Print”; “Sympathy and the Early US Novel”; and our literary theory course. I’m co-editor of a forthcoming edition of Pauline Hopkins’s 1903 Afrofuturist novel “Of One Blood”; I co-direct a digital humanities project on the Colored American Magazine, an early-20th century Black periodical; and I’m completing a book on professionalism, affect, and the novel. As a first-gen college graduate, I’m committed to mentoring undergraduate research and working to expand student access to and engagement with digital archives.

View Full Bio

Barbara UngarProfessor of English

My specialization is in poetry, particularly 19th- through 21st-century poetry. A passionate and devoted teacher, I love to teach literature, from early world literature right up to contemporary American, as well as creative writing. I have published eight books of poetry, several of which have won multiple awards. My most recent is a chapbook, “EDGE” (named for the Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered species lists), inspired by my current research and teaching interest: the sixth extinction and global climate crisis.

View Full Bio

Career Outlook

Schools need great teachers (a lot of them)

The New York State Department of Labor projects that jobs for Pre-K-12 teachers will increase by 11% between 2018 and 2028 — creating more than 60,000 new positions. English Language Arts is among the needed specialty areas, according to the New York State United Teachers.

Schools and other educational organizations employing Saint Rose graduates:

  • Doane Stuart School
  • Shenendehowa High School
  • Green Tech High Charter School
  • Cengage Learning
  • Hudson Valley Community College
  • Barrio Alegría, Reading, Pennsylvania
  • Farnsworth Middle School, Guilderland, New York
  • Albany High School
  • St. Mary’s School, Waterford, New York
  • Democrats for Education Reform
  • On-Ramps Executive Search Firm
  • University at Albany, Office of Career and Professional Placement

Contact Us Today

Of course, if you have any questions, please reach out. We’re here to help.

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