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Bachelor’s Degree in Forensic Psychology

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Top 10 College
for Forensic Psychology
Saint Rose has been named a top 10 college for forensic psychology by College Gazette in 2021.

Choose Saint Rose for Your Bachelor’s Degree in Forensic Psychology

Those who have a passion for criminal justice and how people think may want to consider a bachelor’s degree in forensic psychology. The field of forensic psychology combines interesting elements from both fields of interest.

The College of Saint Rose is a top five granter of undergraduate forensic psychology degrees in the country and one of only 20 programs in the United States. As a result, we attract curious, motivated, and talented students from across the country.

Forensic psychology majors take both psychology and criminal justice courses. Students can choose one of four concentrations to place greater emphasis on their specific areas of interest:

  • Clinical
  • Legal
  • Law Enforcement
  • Social/Cognitive/Developmental

A forensic psychology degree grounds students in psychological research, which opens the door to a wide range of career opportunities, no matter which concentration is chosen.

Saint Rose offers the only forensic psychology major that includes designated forensic psychology courses at both the introductory and advanced level – in addition to a forensic psychology capstone.

Forensic psychology major courses offer students a chance to experience the field in a way that fully integrates psychology and criminal justice. The forensic psychology program is led by Dr. Katlyn Farnum, associate professor of forensic psychology. Dr. Farnum earned a Master of Legal Studies and a Ph.D. in Social Psychology simultaneously, so her approach to psychology focuses strongly on legal perspective. And we’re unique in that we have two dedicated forensic psychology faculty working with our undergrads. Dr. Lillian Rodriguez Steen is an expert in developmental forensic psychology.

What You Can Do with a Forensic Science Degree

With a strong foundation in psychological research as well as a baseline in criminal justice, students can use a forensic psychology degree from Saint Rose to enter the job market right after college in various fields, including paralegal, police officer, corrections officer, juvenile justice advocate, and more.

The research foundation provided by Saint Rose also ensures students are well-equipped for graduate school if they want to become licensed to practice. Before practicing as a psychologist, it’s necessary to earn a master’s degree in mental health counseling or clinical social work or a Ph.D. or Psy.D. in clinical or counseling psychology.

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Program Highlights

You’ll learn from experienced faculty who are focused on your success, alongside bright, motivated classmates who challenge and support you.

  • Located in the state capital of New York, Saint Rose sends students to internships with the FBI, Capital District Psychiatric Center, and more.
  • Work on true cold cases in our Cold Case Analysis Center or practice courtroom skills on our competitive Mock Trial Team.
  • Undergraduate research opportunities allow you to examine issues you care about under the guidance of our faculty. Students often present their findings at the Eastern Psychological Association professional conferences – a great place to network.
  • The research skills emphasized in the program sets you up with a competitive graduate school application and success in your post-baccalaureate studies.
  • If you really want to explore forensic psychology now is the time. Want to practice as a forensic psychologist? Graduate programs in forensic psychology do not always make you eligible for licensure. You’ll need a master’s or doctoral degree in either mental health counseling, clinical social work, counseling, or psychology for that. The College of Saint Rose offers excellent license eligible programs in both mental health counseling and clinical social work.
  • Thinking about law school? More and more law schools are looking for interdisciplinary candidates? Want options? If you decide forensic psychology isn’t for you, the degree still prepares you well for a variety of psychology and criminal justice careers.

Curriculum and Internships

With 73 required credits, the education that forensic psychology degree students acquire has a much greater breadth and depth within the field in comparison to most other institutions.

You can opt for a general degree, where coursework is distributed more evenly across psychology, criminal justice, and law, or you can choose from one of four concentrations:

  • Clinical – take more coursework in psychology, providing ideal preparation for a clinical or counseling graduate degree
  • Legal – take more coursework in law to set yourself up for law school
  • Law Enforcement – take more coursework in criminal justice to point yourself toward a career in law enforcement or corrections
  • Social/Cognitive/Developmental – take courses in these specific areas to prepare for a research career examining important psychological variables in forensic psychology.In addition, the William J. Hagan Research Honors Concentration may be completed by qualified forensic psychology students with strong interest in graduate school and/or post-graduate work involving research.

Faculty use their connections to assist students in securing great internships.

View Course Requirements

Note: Learning Objectives are based on the American Psychological Association’s Comprehensive Learning Goals for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (from the American Psychological Association Guidelines for Undergraduate Psychology Major, version 2.0, 2013).

  • Knowledge base relevant to Forensic Psychology;
  • Scientific inquiry and critical thinking;
  • Ethical and social responsibility in a diverse world;
  • Communication;
  • Professional development.

Being part of the forensic psychology program at The College of Saint Rose is a fulfilling experience that has utterly shaped my future. Before pursuing my undergraduate education, I was uncertain how I could merge my passion for psychology and criminal justice.

Not only is it thrilling to take some of the best criminal justice courses throughout my college career, but I also get to fuse them with amazing psychology courses, and it is the combination of the two that make me feel like such a versatile candidate for my career.”

Glesaidys Eve '23

BS Forensic Psychology

Prior to discovering the forensic psychology major, I knew I wanted my future career to be either criminal justice or psychology – both of which I thought would be well suited for me, but I couldn’t choose. I will be the first to admit my focus on these areas was largely from modern television and literature about true crime and criminal profiling.

What I didn’t know is that it was actually possible to do both, and so much more. Discovering the forensic psychology field opened a host of new doors and opportunities as I realized it was possible to combine the two areas I was passionate in into a career."

Abigail Koller '17

BS Forensic Psychology MA in Forensic Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University Forensic psychologist assistant and director of psychology testing for the Center for Forensic and Clinical Psychology of New Jersey, which conducts psychological evaluations for criminal, civil, and immigration cases

Upstate Unsolved Podcast

A WGY and iHeartRadio investigative podcast going beyond the headlines of Upstate NY’s unsolved crimes, in partnership with The Cold Case Analysis Center at The College of Saint Rose.

Upstate Unsolved Podcast

Loretta A. Preska Mock Trial Courtroom

In our authentic mock courtroom, our Mock Trial Team prepares for The American Mock Trial Association’s regional and national tournaments.

Meet Our Forensic Psychology Faculty

Our faculty are great scholars, but your success is their top priority. Unlike large research institutions, Saint Rose is a place where professors invest in their students and put their energy into teaching, making for compelling classes and great learning outcomes.

Kathleen Crowley Professor of Psychology

I teach courses in introductory psychology, developmental psychology, the psychology of gender, and psychological perspectives on parenting. I’ve had many experiences abroad, including a fellowship where I served as a foreign affairs officer at the U.S. Department of State, monitoring and formulating federal government policy to promote human rights throughout the South and Central Asia Region. I love studying cross-cultural similarities and differences in parenting and child development and bringing this global perspective into my classroom.

Nancy Dorr Professor of Psychology

I teach health psychology, research methods and statistics, the psychology of death and dying, human sexuality, motivation, the psychology of good and evil, and industrial/organizational psychology. My research focuses on social and personality aspects of health and well-being, management of chronic illness, and aging in place among older adults, and I’ve worked with alumni on some of these research projects.

Katlyn Farnum Associate Professor of Forensic Psychology

I am the College’s dedicated faculty member in forensic science. My background is in social psychology and law, and I focus my research on the psychological and legal intersection of the occurrence and experience of discrimination. I’ve presented and published research on sexual harassment and objectification, age discrimination, housing discrimination, mental illness in the workplace, workplace retaliation, and juvenile sex offenders. I’ve loved working with students on their research projects and then taking them to the Eastern Psychological Association to present their work.

Rob Flint Professor of Psychology

I am a behavioral neuroscientist and teach a variety of courses including Biopsychology, Psychopharmacology, Neuropsychology, Learning & Memory, and Sensation & Perception. One of my favorite courses to teach is our First-Year Seminar because I get the opportunity to work closely with a small group of eager new majors who are just starting their college careers. My students and I conduct research on the neurobiological processes associated with learning and memory. In particular, we are interested in the neuroanatomical substrates of learning and memory and the factors that modulate memory formation, particularly stress and arousal.

Kathleen CrowleyProfessor of Psychology

I teach courses in introductory psychology, developmental psychology, the psychology of gender, and psychological perspectives on parenting. I’ve had many experiences abroad, including a fellowship where I served as a foreign affairs officer at the U.S. Department of State, monitoring and formulating federal government policy to promote human rights throughout the South and Central Asia Region. I love studying cross-cultural similarities and differences in parenting and child development and bringing this global perspective into my classroom.

Nancy DorrProfessor of Psychology

I teach health psychology, research methods and statistics, the psychology of death and dying, human sexuality, motivation, the psychology of good and evil, and industrial/organizational psychology. My research focuses on social and personality aspects of health and well-being, management of chronic illness, and aging in place among older adults, and I’ve worked with alumni on some of these research projects.

Katlyn FarnumAssociate Professor of Forensic Psychology

I am the College’s dedicated faculty member in forensic science. My background is in social psychology and law, and I focus my research on the psychological and legal intersection of the occurrence and experience of discrimination. I’ve presented and published research on sexual harassment and objectification, age discrimination, housing discrimination, mental illness in the workplace, workplace retaliation, and juvenile sex offenders. I’ve loved working with students on their research projects and then taking them to the Eastern Psychological Association to present their work.

Rob FlintProfessor of Psychology

I am a behavioral neuroscientist and teach a variety of courses including Biopsychology, Psychopharmacology, Neuropsychology, Learning & Memory, and Sensation & Perception. One of my favorite courses to teach is our First-Year Seminar because I get the opportunity to work closely with a small group of eager new majors who are just starting their college careers. My students and I conduct research on the neurobiological processes associated with learning and memory. In particular, we are interested in the neuroanatomical substrates of learning and memory and the factors that modulate memory formation, particularly stress and arousal.

Anne Gilman Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

I do research on how what we already know – like songs we’ve learned or languages we speak – influences how we think and act. Teaching topics like sensation and perception, as well as cognition, lets me connect my research work with what students already understand as they progress through their psychology or communication formation. My favorite part of teaching research methods courses is helping students acquire more analytical tools they use to pursue their specific professional interests. Students tell me they appreciate the hands-on activities we do together and my openness to different perspectives.

Ross Krawczyk Associate Professor of Psychology

I’m a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in the assessment and treatment of eating, body image, and weight-related disorders. I also study and work clinically with a variety of health psychology issues including weight management, cardiac rehabilitation, and bariatric surgery. When not at Saint Rose, I maintain a private practice in Albany, New York.

Sonja Miller Senior Adjunct Faculty

I am a clinical psychologist and researcher with more than 20 years of teaching experience. Currently, I teach General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Health Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, African American Psychology, and Developmental Psychology (Life Span), and I love what I teach. I left my last clinical position as a clinician at the Hudson Mohawk Recovery Center to devote my time to instructing college students. Like you, I also have a life outside of school. When I’m not teaching or grading papers, I like to cook, spend time with my middle-schooler, and I love tennis and jazz.

Lillian Rodriguez Steen Assistant Professor of Forensic Psychology

I am an expert in developmental forensic psychology and teach courses in research methods and statistics, introductory and advanced forensic psychology, and general psychology.

Anne GilmanVisiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

I do research on how what we already know – like songs we’ve learned or languages we speak – influences how we think and act. Teaching topics like sensation and perception, as well as cognition, lets me connect my research work with what students already understand as they progress through their psychology or communication formation. My favorite part of teaching research methods courses is helping students acquire more analytical tools they use to pursue their specific professional interests. Students tell me they appreciate the hands-on activities we do together and my openness to different perspectives.

Ross Krawczyk Associate Professor of Psychology

I’m a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in the assessment and treatment of eating, body image, and weight-related disorders. I also study and work clinically with a variety of health psychology issues including weight management, cardiac rehabilitation, and bariatric surgery. When not at Saint Rose, I maintain a private practice in Albany, New York.

Sonja MillerSenior Adjunct Faculty

I am a clinical psychologist and researcher with more than 20 years of teaching experience. Currently, I teach General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Health Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, African American Psychology, and Developmental Psychology (Life Span), and I love what I teach. I left my last clinical position as a clinician at the Hudson Mohawk Recovery Center to devote my time to instructing college students. Like you, I also have a life outside of school. When I’m not teaching or grading papers, I like to cook, spend time with my middle-schooler, and I love tennis and jazz.

Lillian Rodriguez SteenAssistant Professor of Forensic Psychology

I am an expert in developmental forensic psychology and teach courses in research methods and statistics, introductory and advanced forensic psychology, and general psychology.

Daniel Schoenfeld Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Tom Straw Senior Adjunct Faculty

I have been a teacher for over 40 years and have primarily taught the fundamentals of psychology and general psychology at Saint Rose. My main focus has always been on helping students develop the skills necessary to be both effective and efficient independent learners. I do this by encouraging students to be as self-reliant as possible and providing them with as many opportunities as possible to better “learn how to learn.” I want to serve as a valuable resource for each student in their quest to prepare for a successful and fulfilling life in a rapidly changing world.

Ann Zak Professor of Psychology

I conduct research with students on intimate relationships. We’ve studied hook-up culture, online dating apps, social support and romantic relationships and are currently investigating the effects of the pandemic on relationship quality. My favorite courses to teach are Psychology of Love and The Science of Happiness, since students find these courses highly applicable to their lives and well-being.

Daniel SchoenfeldVisiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Tom StrawSenior Adjunct Faculty

I have been a teacher for over 40 years and have primarily taught the fundamentals of psychology and general psychology at Saint Rose. My main focus has always been on helping students develop the skills necessary to be both effective and efficient independent learners. I do this by encouraging students to be as self-reliant as possible and providing them with as many opportunities as possible to better “learn how to learn.” I want to serve as a valuable resource for each student in their quest to prepare for a successful and fulfilling life in a rapidly changing world.

Ann ZakProfessor of Psychology

I conduct research with students on intimate relationships. We’ve studied hook-up culture, online dating apps, social support and romantic relationships and are currently investigating the effects of the pandemic on relationship quality. My favorite courses to teach are Psychology of Love and The Science of Happiness, since students find these courses highly applicable to their lives and well-being.

Career Outcomes

The U.S. Bureau of Labor & Statistics reports very high job growth (19% average) in psychology, with some of the highest rates being psychologists who practice in a criminal/legal setting or work with a criminal population or victims of crime.

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